Results for Additional Issues Blog content

Blog: Voting Is a Start, Not an End

Nov 03, 2015 | By Rachel Schmidt

How great it is that we live in a democratic country where we choose our elected officials. We have a government “by the people and for the people” that rejects the notion that power can be concentrated into the leadership of the unelected few. Historically, democracy has been a cataclysmic shift to the idea that all have the right to take care of society. As people of faith, we participate in our democratic government through voting on election day and through advocacy the rest of the year.

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Blog: When a Speaker Can’t Govern, No One Wants the Job

Oct 20, 2015 | By Rachel Schmidt

The Speaker of the House is a high-power position that sets the tone for the House of Representatives and is second in line for the presidency; a dream for any ambitious politician. Yet, no one seems to want the job. Speaker John Boehner is resigning, Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI) has made it clear he doesn’t want it, and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy dropped out of the running. The reason for the widespread hesitancy could be related to the strong divisions in the Republican Party that have made Speaker Boehner’s job arduous.

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Blog: Criminal Justice Reform and Gun Violence

Aug 31, 2015 | By Joan Neal, NETWORK Strategic Advisor

The country may be reaching a tipping point for criminal justice reform. Both on Capitol Hill and on Pennsylvania Avenue, a steady drumbeat for some kind of reform is likely to reach a crescendo as early as September when Congress returns from their August recess. 

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Blog: Beyond the Surface - Putting Care for Creation to the Test

Jul 14, 2015 | By Sarah Kenny, NETWORK Intern

Laudato Si’, Pope Francis’s revolutionary encyclical, has engendered a sustained media feeding frenzy since its release this June by successfully engaging individuals across borders, ethnicities and creeds.

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Blog: Intentional Diversity

Jul 08, 2015 | By Elizabeth Latham, Summer Intern

If I were to start in my driveway at home, I could walk for an hour before the percentage of white inhabitants would dip below 75%. If I were to walk in a certain direction during that hour, I would end up at the all-girls school I attended for eight years. In the time that I went to school there I could count the number of practicing Jews and Muslims I knew personally on one hand.

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Guest Blog: Remembering the Churchwomen, 35 Years Later

Jun 24, 2015 | By Lora Wedge, former NETWORK staff member and current NETWORK member

This year marks the 35th anniversary of the martyrdom of Ita Ford, Maura Clarke, Dorothy Kazel and Jean Donovan. Dedicated to accompanying the Salvadoran people during the civil war in El Salvador, these courageous churchwomen lost their lives, yet they continue to inspire people committed to peace and justice around the world.

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Blog: Laudato Si’ -- A NETWORK Associate’s Perspective

Jun 19, 2015 | By Nicholas Moffa

When I was a kid, my family always took what I initially considered to be the strangest vacations. While my friends flew off to Disney World, I flew off to…Wyoming. And Alaska, Arizona, and California. While my friends enjoyed amusement park rides, I quickly grew to love hiking, whitewater rafting, horseback riding and kayaking.

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Blog: What I Learned from Marching

Apr 07, 2015 | By Colleen Ross

If your March was anything like mine, it was filled with stories, pictures, and news coverage of the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma-to-Montgomery march for voting rights. It seemed everyone who is anyone traveled to Selma on the anniversary of Bloody Sunday and took their photo walking over the Edmund Pettus Bridge. I read all the articles paying tribute to the leaders of the civil rights movement in the New York Times.

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Blog: Criminal Justice Reform

Mar 05, 2015 | By Joan Neal, NETWORK Strategic Advisor

America’s criminal justice system is broken. Far from being a way to hold offenders accountable while at the same time treating them with compassion and respect, it focuses on retributive rather than restorative justice – punishment rather than rehabilitation. The result is harsh and inconsistent sentencing, overcrowded prisons, and a growing group of citizens who find it increasingly more difficult to successfully reenter society.

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